ANTOA POETRY: The Half Crown

I’m wearing a half crown

Sitting on the fence rather

Than the throne of my ancestors.

Their culture, parked on one side 

Of my brain. And the other, a plain field left for me to choose a path.

The culture is rich, but leaves many 

Poor.

Too poor that you can’t fight them.

Their words are gold and strong as Diamond.

You try to change them, but realise CHANGE isn’t CONSTANT.

Their ways continue to appear in front.

Old and timeless as the pyramid.

It’s hard to break them.

Heavy is the head that tries.

They say the Old Good Days are better.

So every new day feels bad.

I’m wearing a half crown

Sitting on the fence rather

Than the throne of my ancestors.

A young and vibrant rebel,

With one side of my head tinted

Grey.

A Somali pirate, with an eye closed.

I’m in a black fight not in a white Vessel.

But between the new and old,

Separated like the Pacific and Atlantic.

By Elijah Christopher

Elijah Christopher

Elijah Christopher is a journalist at A New Touch Of Africa, is also a creative writer, a poet, and an IT enthusiast. He contributed to the collaborative poem written in celebration of Edwin Morgan Centenary, the first Glasgow poet laureate and Scottish national poet from the University of Glasgow. He loves meeting people and learning about new places, cultures, events, and lifestyles.

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