Contact Information

New York

We Are Available 24/ 7. Call Now.

Whenever you hear the sound of Bata Drums accompanied with the aromas of Gbegiri, Amala, Ewedu, Efo Riro, please name them; Yorubas are at work.

Oral history recorded under the Oyo Empire points that the Yoruba ethnic group in Nigeria hails from the population of the older kingdom of Ile-Ife, Osun.

Archeological studies show that the settlement at Ile-Ife can be traced to the fourth century BC.

Since I’m honestly not here to talk about Archeology and History, let’s go straight to the party–the owanbe.

When it comes to traditional occasions or let’s say special occasions like weddings, bridal shower including funerals as well, the Yoruba fashion sense is loud. I give it to them. Not just me, the whole ethnic groups would nod in agreement.

The Yoruba people prefer very bright and outstanding garments–keyphrase, outstanding. They always standout in the crowd with that usual attention-calling cultural outfit.

To get fully dressed from head to toe when Owanbe is nextdoor away or kilometers away, you’d find women, men, and children dressed these way:

Typical Yoruba cultural outfit for women and men:

Women:

Buba

Buba is genderless. It’s a loose-fitting blouse with a round or V-shaped neckline and long sleeves. Its length is a little bit lower to the waistline. Both men and women enjoy wearing it at home and at special occasions.

Iro

A long wrap-around skirt. The rectangular piece of cloth is wrapped around the waist and hips and tucked in at the end.

Gele

This is a traditional Nigerian headdress worn by women. They come in different styles and sizes and are wrapped around the head. 

Men:

Agbada

A men’s rope that is worn over other clothes. It is worn usually for formal events.

Sokoto (Pronounced as SHOKOTO)

A loose-fitting trousers with a drawstring for waist adjustment.

Perhaps nobody would ever know why the world loves to party but yet the Yorubas are best known for keeping the Owanbe vibe on hundred 💯 

By Elijah Christopher

 

Share:

Elijah Christopher is a lifelong creative artist and a journalist for “A New Touch Of Africa”, an American news media and magazine focusing on Africa-related issues, fashion, new technologies and innovations. He has contributed to several published works, most notably a collaborative poem celebrating Scottish poet Edwin Morgan and in 2021 was the winner of the DIAJ Award for his photo-artistry.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.