South Africa’s military joins police to bring chaos to order

South Africa‘s government has tightened security for the protection of properties and the lives of people deploying about 25, 000 troops to support the police in calming the unrest in the country.

It’s been a week-long of this chaos which initially started as a result of South Africa’s ex president Jacob Zuma handing himself to police for corruption charges. But what appeared as a demonstration escalated into looting and rioting drawing huge attention to inequality and poverty.

On Thursday,  117 people were reported killed. The deployment of over 20, 000 soldiers happens to be one of the largest deployments of soldiers since the end of white minority rule in 1994.

SOUTH AFRICA’S RESPONSE TO THE UNREST

The government started with half the number yesterday, flooding the streets with 10, 000 tough uniform men. 

The troops were conveyed in aeroplanes, choppers, buses, and trucks, landing them in the troubled areas in Gauteng and KwaZulu-Natal province. However, the violence has traveled to seven other provinces.

So far, over 2,200 people have been arrested. According to Khumbudzo Ntshavheni, the acting minister in the presidency, the country is now “relatively calm”, but in KwaZulu-Natal region the “situation remains volatile, but much improved and moving towards stability”.

Speaking live today, current South Africa president Cyril Ramaphosa is saying that the unrest was actually planned with information coming from intel, though their intentions not clear.

“This is not what we want to see in our country,” he said.

By Elijah Christopher

Elijah Christopher

Elijah Christopher is a journalist at A New Touch Of Africa, is also a creative writer, a poet, and an IT enthusiast. He contributed to the collaborative poem written in celebration of Edwin Morgan Centenary, the first Glasgow poet laureate and Scottish national poet from the University of Glasgow. He loves meeting people and learning about new places, cultures, events, and lifestyles.

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